As the temperature outside drops, we cozy up inside our nice, warm houses. Unfortunately, so do insects and rodents.  Insects and other pests often will enter a home through an unsealed door, torn screen, crack in the foundation or walls. After entry the pest will inhabit a portion of your home and reproduce. After a pest has infested your home it can be very difficult to exterminate.
As the temperature outside drops, we cozy up inside our nice, warm houses. Unfortunately, so do insects and rodents. Insects and other pests often will enter a home through an unsealed door, torn screen, crack in the foundation or walls. After entry the pest will inhabit a portion of your home and reproduce. After a pest has infested your home it can be very difficult to exterminate.
Whether the invaders are as small as an ant or as big as a family of skunks, your best defense against pests is sealing off their entry points into your fortress. Sealing your house can solve many in home infestations.  To prevent these pest from entering your home specific measures can be taken to seal these entry points.
Whether the invaders are as small as an ant or as big as a family of skunks, your best defense against pests is sealing off their entry points into your fortress. Sealing your house can solve many in home infestations. To prevent these pest from entering your home specific measures can be taken to seal these entry points.
  • do

    • seal up cracks and crevices with sealant
    • screen entry points such as vents that open to exteriors
    • remove window air conditioning units
    • assess exterior lighting situation
    • apply insecticide outdoors around perimeter of building by mid-October
  • don't

    • wait to sweep or vacuum up insects
    • fog your entire home or building
    • fear that insects will reproduce indoors
    • worry about bringing outdoor potted plants indoors
    • forget to seal around external pipes leading into the home

Pest Control Services

1

Assess Inspection

We will conduct a thorough inspection of your property, bring in state-of-the-art equipment.

2

Implement Getting the Job Done

We will take care of identified problems and fill out a Pest Control Service Ticket.

3

Monitor A Year-Round Solution

We will check for new pests while monitoring the status of previous treatments.

Reading the title alone reveals one thing you already don’t know about multi-colored Asian lady beetles (MCALB). What are they? You know these little creatures, but you don’t even know it. Another name for the multi-colored Asian lady beetle is lady bug, and there is more to them than meets the eye. Here are the top 3 things you don’t know about these beetles.

1. They aren’t very lady like

The multi-colored Asian lady beetle is not as “tame” as the traditional lady bug. This species is more aggressive. The MCALB gets feisty when in a large group. Large swarms of these bugs can swarm areas and resort to biting when they are on the hunt for shelter in the fall and winter months. If they target your home, they will stop at nothing to make sure you share the space.

2. They are not native lady bugs

The multicolored Asian lady beetle is not native to Minnesota or the United States. People often confuse them with the native lady bug, but they are slightly different. The multi-colored Asian lady beetle was first brought to the United States in the early 1900's. The new species was introduced to control devastating pest populations that attacked American crops. The beetle’s job was to...


Reading the title alone reveals one thing you already don’t know about multi-colored Asian lady beetles (MCALB). What are they? You know these little creatures, but you don’t even know it. Another name for the multi-colored Asian lady beetle is lady bug, and there is more to them than meets the eye. Here are the top 3 things you don’t know about these beetles.

1. They aren’t very lady like

The multi-colored Asian lady beetle is not as “tame” as the traditional lady bug. This species is more aggressive. The MCALB gets feisty when in a large group. Large swarms of these bugs can swarm areas and resort to biting when they are on the hunt for shelter in the fall and winter months. If they target your home, they will stop at nothing to make sure you share the space.

2. They are not native lady bugs

The multicolored Asian lady beetle is not native to Minnesota or the United States. People often confuse them with the native lady bug, but they are slightly different. The multi-colored Asian lady beetle was first brought to the United States in the early 1900's. The new species was introduced to control devastating pest populations that attacked American crops. The beetle’s job was to control aphids and other pests that fed on pecan, trees, citrus trees and alfalfa crops.

Not too long ago, the USDA, state agencies, local agencies and the Forestry Commission released the Asian lady beetle to control aphid, mile, and scale insect populations. The goal was to reduce pesticide use.

3. They smell

Yes, those cute, little bugs that your kids like to play with and you like to see in your garden can actually get quite smelly. The MCALB will release a stinky substance that is yellow in color when they are stressed or agitated. The smelly stuff is also called “reflex bleeding,” and it comes from their joints.

This fall bug is not a dangerous threat to you or your family. The beetle also won’t eat your furniture or damage home materials, but they are opportunistic. If you have cracks and crevices around your home, now is the time when the multi-colored Asian lady beetle will sneak inside and hide out for the winter. The population will grow out of control, and the beetles won't leave on their own.

Don’t share your home with an infestation of lady beetles this winter. Contact Adam’s Pest Control and ask about our home pest control solutions. Available in Plymouth, Mankato, and throughout our Minnesota and Western Wisconsin service area, our pest control program consists of a thorough inspection, recommendations for exclusion and prevention, and year-round treatments. Call now to see how you can prevent multi-colored Asian lady beetles and other pests from overstaying their welcome this fall and winter.    

Reading the title alone reveals one thing you already don’t know about multi-colored Asian lady beetles (MCALB). What are they? You know these little creatures, but you don’t even know it. Another name for the multi-colored Asian lady beetle is lady bug, and there is more to them than meets the eye. Here are the top 3 things you don’t know about these beetles.

1. They aren’t very lady like

The multi-colored Asian lady beetle is not as “tame” as the traditional lady bug. This species is more aggressive. The MCALB gets feisty when in a large group. Large swarms of these bugs can swarm areas and resort to biting when they are on the hunt for shelter in the fall and winter months. If they target your home, they will stop at nothing to make sure you share the space.

2. They are not native lady bugs

The multicolored Asian lady beetle is not native to Minnesota or the United States. People often confuse them with the native lady bug, but they are slightly different. The multi-colored Asian lady beetle was first brought to the United States in the early 1900's. The new species was introduced to control devastating pest populations that attacked American crops. The beetle’s job was to control aphids and other pests that fed on pecan, trees, citrus trees and alfalfa crops.

Not too long ago, the USDA, state agencies, local agencies and the Forestry Commission released the Asian lady beetle to control aphid, mile, and scale insect populations. The goal was to reduce pesticide use.

3. They smell

Yes, those cute, little bugs that your kids like to play with and you like to see in your garden can actually get quite smelly. The MCALB will release a stinky substance that is yellow in color when they are stressed or agitated. The smelly stuff is also called “reflex bleeding,” and it comes from their joints.

This fall bug is not a dangerous threat to you or your family. The beetle also won’t eat your furniture or damage home materials, but they are opportunistic. If you have cracks and crevices around your home, now is the time when the multi-colored Asian lady beetle will sneak inside and hide out for the winter. The population will grow out of control, and the beetles won't leave on their own.

Don’t share your home with an infestation of lady beetles this winter. Contact Adam’s Pest Control and ask about our home pest control solutions. Available in Plymouth, Mankato, and throughout our Minnesota and Western Wisconsin service area, our pest control program consists of a thorough inspection, recommendations for exclusion and prevention, and year-round treatments. Call now to see how you can prevent multi-colored Asian lady beetles and other pests from overstaying their welcome this fall and winter.    


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