As the temperature outside drops, we cozy up inside our nice, warm houses. Unfortunately, so do insects and rodents.  Insects and other pests often will enter a home through an unsealed door, torn screen, crack in the foundation or walls. After entry the pest will inhabit a portion of your home and reproduce. After a pest has infested your home it can be very difficult to exterminate.
As the temperature outside drops, we cozy up inside our nice, warm houses. Unfortunately, so do insects and rodents. Insects and other pests often will enter a home through an unsealed door, torn screen, crack in the foundation or walls. After entry the pest will inhabit a portion of your home and reproduce. After a pest has infested your home it can be very difficult to exterminate.
Whether the invaders are as small as an ant or as big as a family of skunks, your best defense against pests is sealing off their entry points into your fortress. Sealing your house can solve many in home infestations.  To prevent these pest from entering your home specific measures can be taken to seal these entry points.
Whether the invaders are as small as an ant or as big as a family of skunks, your best defense against pests is sealing off their entry points into your fortress. Sealing your house can solve many in home infestations. To prevent these pest from entering your home specific measures can be taken to seal these entry points.
  • do

    • seal up cracks and crevices with sealant
    • screen entry points such as vents that open to exteriors
    • remove window air conditioning units
    • assess exterior lighting situation
    • apply insecticide outdoors around perimeter of building by mid-October
  • don't

    • wait to sweep or vacuum up insects
    • fog your entire home or building
    • fear that insects will reproduce indoors
    • worry about bringing outdoor potted plants indoors
    • forget to seal around external pipes leading into the home

Pest Control Services

1

Assess Inspection

We will conduct a thorough inspection of your property, bring in state-of-the-art equipment.

2

Implement Getting the Job Done

We will take care of identified problems and fill out a Pest Control Service Ticket.

3

Monitor A Year-Round Solution

We will check for new pests while monitoring the status of previous treatments.

If boxelder bugs are visiting your property, you're likely to notice it. These bugs come by the hundreds, and even thousands. When they do, they cling to walls, congregate on sills, and cover screens. And, when they get inside, it is even more noticeable. Let's take a look at these bugs up close and personal and discuss ways you can deal with them.

What do boxelder bugs look like?

The boxelder bug is a flat, elongate-oval shape with six legs, two long antennae, and wings. An adult is a mixture of black and reddish coloration. An immature nymph has more red in its color. These insects grow to be around 1/2 an inch in length.

What threat are boxelder bugs?

When boxelder bugs get into a home they can use their piercing-sucking mouthparts to puncture the skin and leave red bumps. They can also stain drapes, curtains, tapestries, upholstered furniture, clothing, and other fabrics with their reddish-orange droppings.

Why are boxelder bugs trying to get in?

These insects feed on the developing seeds of boxelder trees. If you have these trees in your yard, it is likely that you'll have boxelder bugs. They are also known to feed on various plants, maple trees, ash trees, and fruit. But...


If boxelder bugs are visiting your property, you're likely to notice it. These bugs come by the hundreds, and even thousands. When they do, they cling to walls, congregate on sills, and cover screens. And, when they get inside, it is even more noticeable. Let's take a look at these bugs up close and personal and discuss ways you can deal with them.

What do boxelder bugs look like?

The boxelder bug is a flat, elongate-oval shape with six legs, two long antennae, and wings. An adult is a mixture of black and reddish coloration. An immature nymph has more red in its color. These insects grow to be around 1/2 an inch in length.

What threat are boxelder bugs?

When boxelder bugs get into a home they can use their piercing-sucking mouthparts to puncture the skin and leave red bumps. They can also stain drapes, curtains, tapestries, upholstered furniture, clothing, and other fabrics with their reddish-orange droppings.

Why are boxelder bugs trying to get in?

These insects feed on the developing seeds of boxelder trees. If you have these trees in your yard, it is likely that you'll have boxelder bugs. They are also known to feed on various plants, maple trees, ash trees, and fruit. But boxelder bugs will not come into your yard just to feed. When the temperature drop, they come seeking harborage.

How do I keep boxelder bugs out?

  • When boxelder bugs congregate on your home, it is important that they don't find a way in. Do a close inspection of your exterior walls and use a caulking gun to seal any potential entry points you find.

  • Soapy water can be used to kill boxelder bugs on the outside of your home, but you should not kill them this way when they get inside. If boxelder bugs escape into your wall voids and die it can attract dermestid beetles. It is best to use a vacuum to get rid of them inside your home. Be sure to dispose of the bag outside.

  • The best solution for boxelder bugs and other overwintering pests is to hire a professional pest control company to apply a spray to your exterior walls. This will keep them out of your home and prevent them from being an eyesore when they come to congregate.

For assistance with boxelder bugs in Minneapolis and throughout Minnesota, contact Adam's Pest Control. Our QualityPro-certified team will help you keep your home a bug-free zone.

If boxelder bugs are visiting your property, you're likely to notice it. These bugs come by the hundreds, and even thousands. When they do, they cling to walls, congregate on sills, and cover screens. And, when they get inside, it is even more noticeable. Let's take a look at these bugs up close and personal and discuss ways you can deal with them.

What do boxelder bugs look like?

The boxelder bug is a flat, elongate-oval shape with six legs, two long antennae, and wings. An adult is a mixture of black and reddish coloration. An immature nymph has more red in its color. These insects grow to be around 1/2 an inch in length.

What threat are boxelder bugs?

When boxelder bugs get into a home they can use their piercing-sucking mouthparts to puncture the skin and leave red bumps. They can also stain drapes, curtains, tapestries, upholstered furniture, clothing, and other fabrics with their reddish-orange droppings.

Why are boxelder bugs trying to get in?

These insects feed on the developing seeds of boxelder trees. If you have these trees in your yard, it is likely that you'll have boxelder bugs. They are also known to feed on various plants, maple trees, ash trees, and fruit. But boxelder bugs will not come into your yard just to feed. When the temperature drop, they come seeking harborage.

How do I keep boxelder bugs out?

  • When boxelder bugs congregate on your home, it is important that they don't find a way in. Do a close inspection of your exterior walls and use a caulking gun to seal any potential entry points you find.

  • Soapy water can be used to kill boxelder bugs on the outside of your home, but you should not kill them this way when they get inside. If boxelder bugs escape into your wall voids and die it can attract dermestid beetles. It is best to use a vacuum to get rid of them inside your home. Be sure to dispose of the bag outside.

  • The best solution for boxelder bugs and other overwintering pests is to hire a professional pest control company to apply a spray to your exterior walls. This will keep them out of your home and prevent them from being an eyesore when they come to congregate.

For assistance with boxelder bugs in Minneapolis and throughout Minnesota, contact Adam's Pest Control. Our QualityPro-certified team will help you keep your home a bug-free zone.


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