As the temperature outside drops, we cozy up inside our nice, warm houses. Unfortunately, so do insects and rodents.  Insects and other pests often will enter a home through an unsealed door, torn screen, crack in the foundation or walls. After entry the pest will inhabit a portion of your home and reproduce. After a pest has infested your home it can be very difficult to exterminate.
As the temperature outside drops, we cozy up inside our nice, warm houses. Unfortunately, so do insects and rodents. Insects and other pests often will enter a home through an unsealed door, torn screen, crack in the foundation or walls. After entry the pest will inhabit a portion of your home and reproduce. After a pest has infested your home it can be very difficult to exterminate.
Whether the invaders are as small as an ant or as big as a family of skunks, your best defense against pests is sealing off their entry points into your fortress. Sealing your house can solve many in home infestations.  To prevent these pest from entering your home specific measures can be taken to seal these entry points.
Whether the invaders are as small as an ant or as big as a family of skunks, your best defense against pests is sealing off their entry points into your fortress. Sealing your house can solve many in home infestations. To prevent these pest from entering your home specific measures can be taken to seal these entry points.
  • do

    • seal up cracks and crevices with sealant
    • screen entry points such as vents that open to exteriors
    • remove window air conditioning units
    • assess exterior lighting situation
    • apply insecticide outdoors around perimeter of building by mid-October
  • don't

    • wait to sweep or vacuum up insects
    • fog your entire home or building
    • fear that insects will reproduce indoors
    • worry about bringing outdoor potted plants indoors
    • forget to seal around external pipes leading into the home

Pest Control Services

1

Assess Inspection

We will conduct a thorough inspection of your property, bring in state-of-the-art equipment.

2

Implement Getting the Job Done

We will take care of identified problems and fill out a Pest Control Service Ticket.

3

Monitor A Year-Round Solution

We will check for new pests while monitoring the status of previous treatments.

FSMA

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law in 2011 to protect US consumers from food safety risks by shifting the focus from responding to risks to more active prevention. At the time it was hailed as the first major overhaul of the US nation’s food safety practices since 1938. As such, FSMA […]

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FSMA

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law in 2011 to protect US consumers from food safety risks by shifting the focus from responding to risks to more active prevention. At the time it was hailed as the first major overhaul of the US nation’s food safety practices since 1938. As such, FSMA […]

The post Food Safety Modernization Act – what it means, and how food businesses should respond appeared first on The Rentokil Blog.

FSMA

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law in 2011 to protect US consumers from food safety risks by shifting the focus from responding to risks to more active prevention.

At the time it was hailed as the first major overhaul of the US nation’s food safety practices since 1938. As such, FSMA demands serious attention from any organisation concerned with global food standards. The Act is also now reaching a level of maturity, with US businesses setting compliance deadlines for international partners. Accepted procedures and protocols are also rapidly emerging for companies that want to achieve compliance in the safest and most effective ways.

If you haven’t done so already, the time is now to look at what you might need to do to respond.

Step 1: Check if FSMA applies to you

The most significant change that FSMA brings is that it gives the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) new enforcement powers focused on prevention and risk-based food safety standards. It also looks at the food supply chain from end-to-end and covers most types of company that either (a) grow, harvest, pack, or hold produce; or (b) run facilities that process food for human consumption.

From an international perspective, FSMA also provides the FDA with the tools to hold imported foods to the same standards – so it applies to international suppliers and producers of food as much as it does to US businesses. Specifically, FSMA applies to you if you are:

  • A US food manufacturer with a domestic supply chain
  • Or a foreign food manufacturing site that supplies food to the US

It should also be noted that the FSMA regulations focus on addressing food safety risks from microbial pathogen contamination (e.g. Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, and Shigella). However, the regulations do not address food safety risks from genetically engineered crops, pesticide use, or antibiotic resistance.

FSMA

Step 2: Check timelines and what you need to do to respond

Timelines for compliance set out by the FDA are complex and can depend on the size of your organisation. In some cases, they depend on the type of product you produce. Some US food businesses are also now imposing their advanced compliance expectation dates, which you’ll need to comply with if you want to carry on doing business with them.

For the latest information on compliance dates and timeliness, the best thing to do is to reference compliance dates on the FDA website.

Step 3: Get FSMA ready

For those preparing for FSMA compliance, it’s important to ensure you have the right pre-requisite programs and risk-based preventative controls in place. Various guidance documents and audit checklists have been made available for download.

For example, BRC Global Standards offer a free module, the ‘FSMA Preventive Controls Preparedness Module and Guidance for BRC certified Facilities’, which has been designed to identify the key prescriptive elements your facility should have in place to meet the regulatory requirements. It has also been designed to apply to any facility producing products or ingredients destined for the US market.

Once completed, you should then attend a Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance (FSPCA) training course and use the learnings to review and perform a self-assessment. This will allow you and your organisation to prepare procedures and establish necessary controls for FSMA before you contact your certification body and arrange a FSMA audit. Following this route will enable you to become officially certified as FSMA ready.

If you are following the BRC Standards methodology, you should also call the FSMA certification body and instruct them to add the FSMA Preventive Controls Preparedness Module and Guidance for BRC-certified Facilities on to their next planned audit.

Further guidance is available from www.brcglobalstandards.com, alternatively, you can email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for further assistance.

FSMA food safety

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